Rock Island Line Corridor

You can assist with the acquisition and development of the Rock Island Trail by making a donation to the Missouri State Parks Foundation. Donate online or mail your check to:

Missouri State Parks Foundation
201 W. Broadway, Building 4
Columbia, MO 65203 

All checks should be made payable to the Missouri State Parks Foundation.

Donate Here

Public Comments

2018 Survey Responses to the fall public meetings held by Missouri State Parks have been uploaded and are available at  the Public Comment tab below.

Frequently Asked Questions

This information is for general information purposes only and is not a substitute for obtaining legal advice from a qualified attorney.

1. What is the Rock Island corridor?

2. Who is the current owner of the corridor?

3. What is the current status of the corridor?

4. How could the corridor be transferred to Missouri State Parks for the purpose of making it into a trail?

5. Now that the department has signed the Interim Trail Use Agreement, what happens next?

6. How much will it cost to build the 144 miles of trail?

7. Could Missouri State Parks build the trail in sections over the years, similar to the Katy Trail?

8. Where will the money come from to build the trail?

9. I’m interested in making a donation. How do I get started?

10. Why did Missouri State Parks take so much time to make a decision regarding the corridor?

11. How would Missouri State Parks address fencing needs for private property along the trail?

12. I farm on both sides of the tracks. How do I get my livestock and farm equipment across the trail?

13. Will private crossings still exist?

14. What if someone comes onto my property?

1. What is the Rock Island corridor?
The Rock Island Corridor is a 144.3 mile section of the former Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad that runs from Windsor, Mo., to Beaufort, Mo.

2. Who is the current owner of the corridor?
The corridor is owned by Missouri Central Railroad Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Ameren Missouri. Missouri Central Railroad retains responsibility for the corridor until the property is transferred to the Missouri Department of Natural Resources for development into a recreational trail. If this occurs, the corridor would be managed by Missouri State Parks, a division of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.

3. What is the current status of the corridor?
In 2014, Missouri Central Railroad began the process to abandon the line in two segments: (1) between mileposts 263.5 and 262.906 near Pleasant Hill, in Cass County, Mo.; (2) and between milepost 215.325 near Windsor, in Pettis County, Mo., and milepost 71.6 near Beaufort, in Franklin County, Mo.

Missouri Central Railroad has completed salvage of the rails and ties along the corridor. On Dec. 17, 2019, the department signed an Interim Trail Use Agreement, paving the way for the transfer of the corridor to the department for development into a recreational trail. The agreement provides that the transfer will only occur once certain conditions are met, including raising sufficient funds to cover the department’s initial costs associated with acceptance of the property.

4. How could the corridor be transferred to Missouri State Parks for the purpose of making it into a trail?
The National Trails System Act, 16 U.S.C. § 1247(d) and 49 C.F.R. § 1152.29, established a process known as “railbanking.” Railbanking is a voluntary agreement between a railroad company and a trail agency to use an out-of-service corridor as a trail until a railroad might need the corridor again for rail service. Because a railbanked corridor is not considered abandoned, it can be sold, leased or donated to a trail manager.

In response to a request submitted by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources, with concurrence from Missouri Central Railroad, the Surface Transportation Board, a federal adjudicatory board responsible for economic regulatory oversight of railroads, issued a Notice of Interim Trail Use Feb. 25, 2015. The Notice of Interim Trail Use authorized the department to negotiate with Missouri Central Railroad for acquisition of the right-of-way for use as a trail under the National Trails System Act. Per 49 CFR Section 1152.29, any interim trail use agreement must include provisions requiring the sponsor to fulfill the following responsibilities:
(i) Managing the right-of-way;
(ii) Any legal liability arising out of the transfer or use of the right-of-way (unless the user is immune from liability, in which case it need only indemnify the railroad against any potential liability); and
(iii) The payment of any and all taxes that may be levied or assessed against the right-of-way.

The department and Missouri Central Railroad have signed an Interim Trail Use Agreement, ensuring the preservation of the former railroad corridor for future transportation use and paving the way for the eventual donation of the property to the department for recreational trail use once certain conditions are met. The interim trail use agreement signed by the parties obligates the department to fulfill the required responsibilities if and when the property is transferred and accepted by the department.

The signing of the agreement took place during a special outdoor event held at 2:00 pm. Dec. 17.

Representatives from the Missouri Central Railroad Company, Ameren Missouri, and the Missouri State Parks Foundation and other state and local officials participated in the event.A media availability session was held immediately after the event, during which department and Ameren representatives were on hand to answer questions and provide one-on-one interviews.

5. Now that the department has signed the Interim Trail Use Agreement, what happens next?
It has taken significant time and resources for the parties to get to this point of signing the interim trail use agreement. The Missouri State Parks Foundation will begin raising the funds and the department will work with the foundation should the funds be raised. Each step is very important and, ultimately, will allow the department to accept responsibility for the Rock Island Corridor.

Signing the agreement sets the framework for the future. The department plans to accept the corridor if the required funds are raised and made available by our partners.

6. How much will it cost to build the 144 miles of trail?
Signing of the agreement does not imply that a fully developed trail is certain. The agreement requires approximately $9.8 million to be raised before the property will be transferred to the department for recreational trail development, to help cover the initial security and management costs.

The $9.8 million figure is based on estimated costs for fencing, signage, security barriers, labor and equipment; as well as projected annual ongoing costs for maintenance and staffing; and contingency for unforeseen liability and structural considerations for bridges and tunnels.

In the interim, the corridor remains Missouri Central Railroad’s property and is not open for public use. An estimated total of $65 million to $85 million will ultimately be needed to fully develop the trail. The project’s funding will likely require a combination of private, public and corporate sources. Interested donors should contact the Missouri State Parks Foundation to learn more about partnering in this effort.

7. Could Missouri State Parks build the trail in sections over the years, similar to the Katy Trail?
Yes. It would not be possible to develop the trail all at once. Development of the trail would occur in sections over several years, as each section of the corridor has different features and challenges.

The Katy Trail would not have been possible without the generosity of Ted and Pat Jones and partnerships like this will be important for our future. As with the development of the Katy Trail, Rock Island will require additional partnerships and commitments.

8. Where will the money come from to build the trail?
Missouri State Parks has not yet identified the resources necessary to build the trail. The funding needs of this project will certainly require additional parties (private, public, corporate) to make a substantial financial commitment. Securing a funding solution is a significant factor in the decision-making process, as existing state parks funding will not be used to develop the Rock Island Trail.

Leading the fundraising effort will be the Missouri State Parks Foundation, a nonprofit organization established to support Missouri’s state park system. The project’s funding will likely require a combination of private, public and corporate sources.

In order for Missouri State Parks to accept responsibility of the corridor, the funds will need to be raised by Dec. 31, 2021.

9. I’m interested in making a donation. How do I get started?
You can assist with the acquisition and development of the Rock Island Trail by making a donation to the Missouri State Parks Foundation. Click here to donate online or mail your check to Missouri State Parks Foundation, 201 W. Broadway, Building 4, Columbia, MO 65203. All checks should be made payable to the Missouri State Parks Foundation.

10. Why did Missouri State Parks take so much time to make a decision regarding the corridor?
The conversion of the corridor into a trail stands to be a significant project, and it was essential to gain a further understanding of the costs, liabilities, and benefits of this potential project. Additionally, as has been the experience with the Katy Trail, the development of a trail and its ongoing operation and maintenance is a large responsibility that requires significant financial resources. The project may require additional funding sources that have yet to be identified. In the time since the NITU was issued, Missouri State Parks obtained a right of entry to the corridor and evaluated the condition and potential costs involved in developing a trail.

11. How would Missouri State Parks address fencing needs for private property along the trail?
If the corridor is transferred to the department, it is the intent of Missouri State Parks to work cooperatively with adjacent landowners along the corridor.

Missouri Central Railroad will retain responsibility of the corridor until the required funds are raised and the property is transferred to the department. If and when the corridor is transferred to the department, Missouri State Parks will provide fencing materials, along with any needed installation and maintenance to adjacent landowners upon request.

12. I farm on both sides of the tracks. How do I get my livestock and farm equipment across the trail?
Missouri State Parks has entered into agreements with adjacent landowners to accommodate these types of requests along the Katy Trail and would work with landowners along the Rock Island corridor as well, should the corridor be transferred to the department and established as a trail.

13. Will private crossings still exist?
Yes. Missouri State Parks will honor any existing real estate agreements between landowners and Missouri Central Railroad. If the corridor is transferred to the department, Missouri State Parks will work with landowners to develop new agreements to allow crossings, access, and occupations of the corridor where needed upon request.

14. What if someone comes onto my property?
Missouri State Parks takes the concerns of adjacent landowners seriously, especially with respect to the potential for intrusion onto private property. If the corridor is transferred to the department, as has been the practice on the Katy Trail, it is the intent of Missouri State Parks to work cooperatively with adjacent landowners along the corridor. Missouri statutes provide protections to landowners adjacent to recreational trails. In addition to statutory protections, Missouri State Parks has worked cooperatively with landowners adjacent to Katy Trail State Park to help minimize the likelihood for trespass from the trail onto adjoining property. This was accomplished primarily by marking the boundaries of state park property with signs placed at regular intervals, which also warn trail users not to trespass. This message is also provided via signage and brochures at all trailhead information depots. If the corridor is developed, Missouri State Parks would develop similar measures for the Rock Island Corridor as well.

Interim Trail Use Agreement (ITUA) Basics:

Signing this ITUA, pursuing dedicated fund legislation, and conducting due diligence activities were the first, necessary steps for the department to move forward with potential acceptance of the corridor. Transfer of the property and any trail development cannot occur until adequate funding becomes available.

  • The ITUA provides more than two years (until December 31, 2021) for individuals and organizations to raise funds toward a goal of $9.8M. The agreement provides that if the designated amount is raised, and environmental assessments do not show any issues that would inhibit development of this resource into a biking and hiking state park, then the department could accept the property on or before December 31, 2021.
  • Legislation was enacted in 2019 to establish a dedicated "Rock Island Trail State Park Endowment Fund" to ensure all funds received or otherwise allocated to the Rock Island State Park effort are used in support of this purpose and not spent for any other reasons. (Section 253.177, RSMo).
  • Missouri State Parks and the Missouri Central Railroad look forward to continuing to work with stakeholders with the dual goals of preserving this valuable transportation corridor and development of this extraordinary outdoor recreation and economic development opportunity for the state.

Links of Interest

Surface Transportation Board
The Surface Transportation Board is an independent adjudicatory and economic-regulatory agency charged by Congress with resolving railroad rate and service disputes and reviewing proposed railroad mergers.

Surface Transportation Board Docket Search
Enter Docket No. AB-1068 (Sub-No. 3X) (Missouri Central Railroad Company- Abandonment Exemption- In Cass, Pettis, Benton, Morgan, Miller, Cole, Osage, Maries, Gasconade, and Franklin Counties, Missouri) to find specific information related to the Rock Island Line Corridor.

Katy Trail State Park
Built on the former corridor of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad (MKT or Katy), the park is 240 miles long and runs between Clinton and Machens with 26 trailheads and four fully restored railroad depots along the way.

Summary of Rock Island Corridor Condition
Missouri State Parks Planning and Development program staff conducted a visual inspection of the Rock Island corridor from mile marker 72 near Beaufort, Missouri, to mile marker 215 near Windsor over a series of trips from April 30, 2018 to May 23, 2018.

Public Comments

2018 Survey Responses

The following 1,875 comments were gathered during a public comment period, which ended Nov. 30, 2018. These comments do not reflect the opinion of the State of Missouri or the Department of Natural Resources’ Division of State Parks, nor are these entities responsible for the content or the factual accuracy of the comments. The responses have not been edited or otherwise altered, except to remove names and other identifying statements, and potentially offensive language. The public comments were provided in response to the following question:

Based upon information provided by Missouri State Parks regarding the Rock Island Line Corridor, are there any additional factors you believe Missouri State Parks should consider?

RILC_Comments_Nov2018.pdf

2017 Survey Responses

The following 8,685 comments were gathered during a public comment period, which ended August 31, 2017. These comments do not reflect the opinion of the State of Missouri or the Department of Natural Resources’ Division of State Parks, nor are these entities responsible for the content or the factual accuracy of the comments. The responses have not been edited or otherwise altered, except to remove names and other identifying statements, and potentially offensive language. The public comments were provided in response to the following question:

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is considering entering into an Interim Trail Use Agreement with Missouri Central Railroad for the purpose of developing the Rock Island Trail Project, a conversion of the former Rock Island Railroad corridor into a 144.3 mile long recreational trail from Windsor, MO, to Beaufort, MO.

Please provide your thoughts, comments, and suggestions regarding DNR entering into an Interim Trail Use Agreement and the Rock Island Trail Project.

RILC_Comments_Aug2017.pdf (This PDF file is approx. 3MB.)

Organization/Public Entity Comment Letters

The following letters were submitted by cities or organizations in reference to the Rock Island Line Corridor. These letters do not reflect the opinion of the State of Missouri or the Department of Natural Resources’ Division of State Parks, nor are these entities responsible for the content or the factual accuracy of the information contained in the letters. The letters have not been edited or otherwise altered.

March 16, 2017 - City of Springfield

May 11, 2017 - City of Rolla

June 23, 2017 - City of Chesterfield

June 28, 2017 - Spirit Trail Coalition / Johnson County Commission

August 3, 2017 - City of Owensville

August 18, 2017 - Adventure Cycling Association

August 24, 2017 - Missouri Farm Bureau Federation

August 28, 2017 - City of Warsaw

August 29, 2017 - Kaysinger Basin Regional Planning Commission

June 18, 2018 - City of Versailles

June 21, 2018 - City of Barnett

July 1, 2018 - City of Stover

August 10, 2018 - City of Greenwood

August 14, 2018 - City of Lee's Summit

August 22, 2018 - Community Foundation of the Ozarks

October 29, 2018 - Capital Region Medical Center

November 5, 2018 - Missourians for Responsible Transportation

November 27, 2018 - Cole Camp Trails Committee

Informational Meetings

Missouri State Parks held a series of three informational meetings in communities along the Rock Island Line Corridor. The purpose of the open house-style meetings was to discuss the potential effects on communities, citizens and Missouri State Parks if the Corridor were to be developed into a long-distance recreational trail.

The meetings included information about the potential costs of trail development and operations, public safety, landowner and legal issues, environmental and natural resource issues and property management options.

The three meetings were held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on the following dates and locations:

Monday, Oct. 29
Scenic Regional Library
503 S. Olive St., Owensville

Tuesday, Oct. 30
Morgan County Library
600 N. Hunter St., Versailles

Thursday, Nov. 1
Citizen’s Civic League Hall
301 Olive St., Meta

Information Presented at the Meeting

 

Public Comment/Feedback

The public comment period has closed. Click here to see the comments.