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Ha Ha Tonka State Park

Park Information

Imposing architecture and breathtaking scenery combine to make Ha Ha Tonka State Park one of Missouri’s most treasured spots. Located on the Lake of the Ozarks, the park features the stone ruins of a turn-of-the-20th-century castle built by a prominent Kansas City businessman high atop a bluff. More than 15 miles of trails traverse the park, leading visitors to sinkholes, natural bridges, caves and down to the lake.

Park Hours

Park Grounds

Summer Hours (On-Season)

  • April through October
    7 a.m. to sunset daily

Winter Hours (Off-Season)

  • November through March
    8 a.m. to sunset daily

The outdoor interpretive area, restrooms and brochures are available during these times. The park gates are closed at sunset. 

Park Office hours

Summer Hours (On-Season)

  • April through October
    10 a.m.- 5 p.m. daily
    On occasion the park office may be temporarily closed while park staff assist large groups or conduct outdoor interpretive programs.

Winter Hours (Off-Season)

  • November through March
    Office is not regularly staffed. Park staff are usually available in the park daily. The office telephone answering machine is monitored for messages during daytime hours.

Visitor Center hours

Summer Hours (On-Season)

  • April through October
    7 a.m. to sunset daily

Winter Hours (Off-Season)

  • November through March
    8 a.m. to sunset daily

The outdoor interpretive area, restrooms and brochures are available during these times. The park gates are closed at sunset. 

Address

1491 State Road D
Camdenton, MO 65020-9801

Phone number

  • Park Office: (573) 346-2986
Name that Trail: This trail is designed especially for people with visual or physical disabilities and is designated as a National Recreation Trail. The trail passes by a quarry pond, which now supports a variety of animal life. A short spur off of the trail takes hikers to the top of the granite outcrop, where they can explore the maze of giant elephant rocks. A second spur brings you to a point overlooking an old quarry site, where Missouri red granite was quarried from the 1860s through the early 1900s. Don’t know the answer? Get your copy of Trails of Missouri State Parks and read more about this and other exciting trails in Missouri state parks and historic sites at mostateparks.com.